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True Fit, an AI platform that decodes size and fit for consumers and retailers, has partnered with ecommerce platform Shopify to bring its technology to merchants of all sizes.

As part of the partnership, Shopify merchants can connect their brand to True Fit’s Fashion Genome, a connected AI fit platform, to remove shopper hesitation around fit. It also delivers consumer confidence and conversion, reducing fit-related returns and growing customer loyalty.

The collaboration said fit is a trust exercise, and reimagining the rudimentary size guide by providing fit recommendations powered by millions of shoppers and enhanced by AI will help merchants of all sizes grow their brands profitably.

“By opening up the power of the Fashion Genome’s machine learning and artificial intelligence data engine to merchants of all sizes on the Shopify platform, we will accelerate merchant growth through frictionless digital discovery and consumption,” said William Adler, president and CEO of True Fit.

“It is our mission to democratise access to the Fashion Genome and artificial intelligence widely across the industry, helping millions of consumers connect to the brands they love. True Fit builds trust between shoppers and brands with deep learning, and in doing so helps merchants cultivate loyal first party audiences, rich consumer preference patterns, and key product fit insights that all help to optimise a profitable growth business.”

A number of retailers, a selection listed below, are turning to technology to enable consumers to select the right fit online. This not only creates an enhanced customer experience, but can also go some way to limit returns.

Asos
Asos introduced Fit Assistant in 2018, which used machine learning to deliver personalised sizing recommendations for its customers. It also tested a Virtual Catwalk, an augmented reality (AR) experience allowing shoppers to view models as if they are walking in the room with them.

Additionally, it has trialled an AR tool called See My Fit. Developed in partnership with Israeli AR company Zeekit it offers customers a simulated view of a product in different sizes and on different body types.

See My Fit aims to help customers make more informed purchasing choices, by better showing how products look on models that more closely reflect individual customers.

By clicking the See My Fit button on one of the 800 dresses involved in the trial, Asos customers will be able to choose to view that dress on a range of 16 models in sizes 4 to 18.

When a customer selects a model, See My Fit digitally maps the product onto that model in a realistic way, taking account of the size, cut and fit of each individual garment. The resulting images appear similar to real photographs.

Fat Face
In January, British lifestyle clothing brand looked to improve customer satisfaction digitally, drive new customer acquisition and reduce fit-related returns by introducing the technology.

At the time Liam Price, head of digital at FatFace, said: “Adopting True Fit is about winning on two fronts – by improving conversion, revisit rates and average order value on the one side, and preventing returns on the other.

“It will help us continue to deliver on our promise to our customers, which is to help them find the products they are looking for, but also help them hold onto these items and keep them, because they are the perfect fit.”

FatFace also aims to unlock insights, data and analytics to improve fit consistency across their range and learn more about their loyal shoppers’ preferences to provide greater personalisation over time.

Nike
Nike added augmented-reality technology to its existing app. The tool enables its customers to scan their feet with a smartphone camera, mapping each foot’s dimensions using a 13-point measuring system.

Nike Fit is programmed using AI, meaning that the more people use it the more accurate it will become.

Nike hopes the tool will reduce the number of size-related returns and increase customer satisfaction.

“Three out of every five people are likely to wear the wrong size shoe,” said Nike. “Length and width don’t provide nearly enough data to get a shoe to fit comfortably. Sizing as we know it is a gross simplification of a complex problem.”

Zalando
The German online platform for fashion is piloting a virtual fitting room experience with millions of customers across all markets. Customers are able to create a 3D avatar by entering their height, weight, and gender.

For a selected range of jeans, which Zalando said is one of the most challenging categories in terms of finding the right size due to the lack of sizing standards, customers can see how different sizes from various brands would fit them, with a heatmap indicating where the item sits tight or loose on the avatar they created.

It has also created personalised size recommendations based on customers’ purchase and return history along with reference items that customers can add to their size profile. For those items where Zalando provides size advice, size-related returns have decreased by 10% versus similar items where size advice is not provided.

Read more about fashion technology trends in the recently published UK Fashion 2023 Report. Download the report in full to discover how apparel, footwear and accessories performed individually in 2022 and where these segments are heading. It also assess how speedy delivery and free returns are among the key factors shaping online fashion shopper purchases.


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